Creating lasting and positive change in Ethiopia

How your donation helps:

Gives a street child a nutritious breakfast and an informal education for one day.

Transport to and from hospital for one woman living in rural Ethiopia.

Will buy a walking or mobility aid for a child living with a physical disability.

Will buy a wheelchair for a child with a physical disability.

Breakfast AND schooling for a street child for 12 months.

Fistula surgery and holistic care at the Hamlin Fistula Hospital.

35c
€20
€25
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€125
€500

What we do:

With your help we support projects in Ethiopia ranging from maternal health and women's welfare, to education and disabilities . We work for an Ethiopia free from poverty, in which every person has access to quality education, healthcare and a life of dignity.

Ethiopia has made huge strides forward since the devastation and despair of the famines during the 1980s. We continue to drive this progression and development further through our trusted partnerships, ensuring that no one is left behind.  If you want to learn more about the impact Ethiopiaid and our partners made during the first semester of 2016, please read our most recent newsletter.

  • Maternal Health

    Ethiopia has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in the world with 10,000 new cases of obstetric fistula each year.

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  • Destructive Diseases

    Ethiopiaid focuses on supporting projects that prevent and treat people living with Noma (an acute and ravaging gangrenous infection affecting the face) and other facial disfigurements.

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  • Education for all

    There are approximately 150,000 children living on the streets of Ethiopia – and 60,000 of those in Addis Ababa.

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  • Women’s Welfare

    Women and girls often face discrimination, gender-based violence, exploitation, trafficking, child marriage and other harmful traditional practices.

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  • Disabilities

    There are 6 million disabled people in Ethiopia, many of whom are denied access to education and are rejected by their families.

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